Van Gogh’s Portraits of François and Jeanne Trabuc

While at the asylum in Saint-Remy, Vincent van Gogh painted a few portraits.  One of the portraits is of Francois Trabuc, the chief orderly, or overseer, at Saint-Paul.  On September 5th or 6th of 1889 Van Gogh wrote to his brother about the portrait and Trabuc, who Van Gogh found to have an interesting look, “Yesterday I began the portrait of the chief attendant, and I may do his wife as well, since he is married and lives in a little farmhouse a stone’s throw from the institution. A most interesting face. There’s a beautiful etching by Legros of an old Spanish grandee – if you remember it, it will …..

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Van Gogh’s Egyptian Mummy Drawings

In June of 1889, while at the asylum in Saint-Remy, Van Gogh created a drawing with blue and black chalk, on bluish gray Ingres paper titled Mask of an Egyptian Mummy.  Shortly before his death, in July of 1890, Van Gogh executed three more drawings of the same subject one with blue caulk and the others with black.  Each is titled Mask of an Egyptian Mummy. In May of 1890, Van Gogh left the hospital and moved to Auvers-sur-Oise.  In June he painted a number of portraits as well as several other works.  In many we see him returning to memories of the past.  Perhaps his original mummy drawing was …..

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Van Gogh’s Church Paintings

On June 17, 1876, Van Gogh wrote to his brother, Theo, about his love for the church, “But the reason I would much sooner give for commending myself to you is my innate love of the church and everything to do with the church, which may lie dormant from time to time but always reawakens; and, if I may say so, although with a sense of great inadequacy and imperfection: the Love of God and of man.” For at least three years Van Gogh pursued his love of the church and his calling to ministry.  He was a student of theology, though he failed his exam as well as a …..

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