Van Gogh’s Portraits of François and Jeanne Trabuc

While at the asylum in Saint-Remy, Vincent van Gogh painted a few portraits.  One of the portraits is of Francois Trabuc, the chief orderly, or overseer, at Saint-Paul.  On September 5th or 6th of 1889 Van Gogh wrote to his brother about the portrait and Trabuc, who Van Gogh found to have an interesting look, “Yesterday I began the portrait of the chief attendant, and I may do his wife as well, since he is married and lives in a little farmhouse a stone’s throw from the institution. A most interesting face. There’s a beautiful etching by Legros of an old Spanish grandee – if you remember it, it will …..

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Dr. Paul-Ferdinand Gachet

During the later portion of Vincent’s stay in Saint Remy he grew weary of his situation and had a desire to return North to the area surrounding Paris. Van Gogh wrote to his brother suggesting that perhaps he could room with fellow artist Camille Pissarro who was experiencing his own difficulties at the time. Theo spoke with Pissarro who said it wouldn’t be practical and instead suggested Van Gogh find a place in Auvers-sur-Oise near a doctor who appreciated impressionist art and enjoyed painting in his spare time, Dr. Paul-Ferdinand Gachet. Dr. Gachet had a medical practice in Paris, but spent the majority of his time at his house in …..

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Van Gogh’s Portrait of Adeline Ravoux

Adeline Ravoux was 13 years old when Vincent van Gogh rented a room in her father’s inn in Auvers-sur-Oise.  Van Gogh made three portraits of the young girl though she only sat for him one time.  One of these portraits he gave to Ravoux and another he sent to his brother, Theo.  He wrote about the portrait in a letter to Theo, “This week I have done a portrait of a girl of about 16, in blue against a blue background, the daughter of the people I am lodging with. I have given her this portrait, but I made a variant of it for you, a size 15 canvas.” In …..

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